Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  24 / 252 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 24 / 252 Next Page
Page Background

85

A BRUNSWICK STATE TWO-HAND PROCESSIONAL SWORD OF THE GUARD OF JULIUS, DUKE OF BRUNSWICK AND LÜNEBURG IN WOLFENBÜTTEL (1528-89),

NO. 21, DATED 1573

with straight double-edged blade of flattened-diamond section sharply tapering at the point, stamped with the bladesmith’s

marks, in a shield an anchor, rectangular ricasso formed with a pair of slender up-turned lugs in the middle, boldly incised with the

crowned Ducal monogram, the number and the date within a linear frame on each side, iron hilt comprising a pair of ribbon-like

quillons each interrupted by a chiselled and engraved fish-shaped moulding, curled forward and back at the respective down-

curved terminals, a pair of small flat engraved serpentine lugs at the base, engraved inner and outer ring-guards, each interrupted

with three baluster mouldings and filled with a saltire, the former with thumb-ring, thick pierced crutch-shaped pommel boldly

engraved with foliage, and early leather-covered wooden grip

131.2 cm; 51

¾

in blade

Provenance

The Brunswick Ducal Zeughaus, Wolfenbüttel.

Duke Julius of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (1528-1589) inherited the title following the death of his two older brothers in battle. He was a

keen supporter of the Reformation and introduced it into the Duchy ofWolfenbüttel.The swords from his Ducal Guard are all numbered

and may be divided into two series, one dated 1573 and the other 1574.The blades are generally inscribed with the date, an arsenal

number and the crowned Ducal monogram IH.There are minor variations within each series and it would appear from the numbered

swords extant that there were a total of around 600 swords in this group - with numbers in each series being recorded in the 290’s. In

1573 a sword was delivered toWolfenbüttel by the armourerWolf Gabriel and it has been suggested that this was possibly a prototype

for the group. Given the large number of differing bladesmith’s marks and the variation in minor details it is likely that the order for both

the 1573 and 1574 swords was contracted to a number of swordsmiths. It is probable that they were originally stored in theWolfenbüttel

Zeughaus and transferred to the Brunswick Zeughaus when the family moved fromWolfenbüttel in 1753/54.The inventory of the Hanover

Zeughaus in 1854 records six of these swords, three dated 1573 and three dated 1574. A document describing the decoration of Schloss

Blankenburg in 1868 with arms and armour from the Brunswick Zeughaus records thirty-six swords which are probably from this group.

‡ £7000-9000

86

A FINE SOUTH GERMAN TWO-HAND SWORD FOR THE UBERLINGEN TOWN GUARD, DATED 1601

with double-edged flat blade sharply tapering at the point (the point of the tip bent), etched on each face with a panel at the forte,

comprising the Imperial eagle charged with the town arms, a Lion rampant, beneath a crested helm surmounted by a rampant demi-lion

clutching a sword, all on a stippled ground beneath, one one face, a trophy-of-arms, the inscription ‘S.MINO.CIVITATIO.VBRELINGEN [sic]’

and the date, and, on the other, a pair of addorsed serpents issuant from a grotesque above the inscription ‘S.MINO.CIVITATIO.VBERLINGEN’,

iron hilt comprising a pair of drooping quillons each with tightly coiled terminal, a pair of lugs behind and a further lug beneath all coiled

en suite

, inner and outer ring-guard each filled with a fleur-de-lys, the leaves formed as matching coils, fluted plummet-shaped pommel,

and early leather-covered wooden grip over bands of cord (small losses)

122.8 cm; 48

in blade

Überlingen, located on the north-western shore of Lake Constance, is first mentioned around 770. The town’s fortifications date to

the 12th century and the reign of Emperor Frederick I ‘Barbarossa’. Given its location it was an important trade centre with

considerable income from the local grain and wine. It became and Imperial Free City in the late 14th century. During the Thirty

Years War the city was unsuccessfully besieged twice by Swedish troops in 1632 and 1634.

A sword with coiling quillons terminals and lugs of similar type is preserved in the Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin, see

Müller and Kölling 1990, p. 198 no. 118.

‡ £6000-8000

87

A NORTH EUROPEAN TWO-HANDED SWORD, POSSIBLY BRUNSWICK LATE 16TH CENTURY

with wavy flat blade, rectangular ricasso incorporating a pair of up-turned lugs, retaining traces of engraving including a Maltese

cross on each face (worn, slightly bent in profile), iron hilt comprising a pair of strongly arched ribbon-like quillons each interrupted by

a chiselled and engraved fish-shaped moulding, curled forward and back at the respective terminals, a pair of small flat lugs at the

base, inner and outer ring-guards, each filled with a plain plate (perhaps later), pierced thick crutch-shaped pommel, and later grip

130.2 cm; 51

¼

in blade

This sword is related to a North German group (distinct from that discussed under lot 85) that included a number formerly

preserved in Schloss Blankenburg that almost certainly originated from the Brunswick Ducal zeughaus inWolfenbüttel. Another

example is preserved in the Bomann Museum, Celle, and another, formerly in the Hanoverian Royal Collection was sold Sotheby’s,

October 2005, lot 230. A large number of related swords are preserved in other North European arsenals including that at Emden.

‡ £4000-6000

24

European Edged Weapons

VARIOUS OWNERS